The Power of Presence Placing the focus more on the "how" than the "what"

As the year draws to a close, program directors and agencies reflect back over what they’ve accomplished – how many families fed, how many volunteer hours served, how many persons enrolled in classes.

But I’m not going to do that.

One of the things that distinguishes LUCHA Ministries is not what we do, but how we do it.  Every leader associated with LUCHA strives to share Christ’s love with those among whom we serve.  So, I want to share with you what we consider our most important “accomplishments” this past year.

We held the hand of a newly-arrived Guatemalan mom as she gave birth to a still-born baby.  We prayed together, and we shed tears as she held him andclaudia-gravesite-small said goodbye.  We were the lone mourners at a graveside service for baby Angel, and knelt in the dirt with Carolina and her 6-year-old daughter to fill the tiny grave.

We sat in the hospital waiting room with Carolina’s long-time friend, Fernando, who stayed with her during the birth and offered his name for baby Angel’s birth certificate when there was no father.

We picked up an angry teen from school who claimed to be sick.  Mina, a US citizen, has spent most of her 14 years with her grandmother and hates everything about her life in the US.  She just wants to return to Mexico, where she can do as she pleases.  Mina tries to make her mom’s life miserable, thinking she’ll send her away.  We provide parenting classes, counseling, and support to her mom and step-dad as they struggle with Mina’s anger, resentment, and destructive behavior.

We marched with Lucy, age 7, and Alan, age 13, in a demonstration in fronwendys-familyt of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) building in Washington, DC.  Their mom, a citizen of Spain, has been detained since July and may receive her final deportation order before the end of the year, as she has run out of options for staying in the US.  Their dad, from Bolivia, struggles to hold the family together.

We’ve spent hours on the phone and in the offices of various healthcare providers, hospitals, and collection agencies on behalf of an uninsured patient with diabetes and renal failure.  Andrés is on dialysis and unable to work, and his teenage daughters are trying to manage his care.

We sat for hours in the ER with a quiet, shy 14-year-old from Guatemala.  His depression had progressed to the point of being suicidal, and he was admitted for in-patient treatment.  Daniel became a special volunteer for LUCHA over the summer, helping with the food pantry, working with younger kids at the pool, and leading recreation and soccer during Kids’ Camp.

We celebrated events with young adults who grew up in LUCHA’s youth groupgerardo-small, and we remembered the challenges they had growing up.  Rosie, from Mexico, now has a new baby, a new job, and became a US citizen this year.  Gerardo enlisted in the Marine Corps, and his Guatemalan family threw a party to celebrate his completion of boot camp.  Antonella, from Nicaragua, graduated with honors from college and is marrying her high school sweetheart.

We’ve been in all the hard places this year – hospitals, cemeteries, court, jail, detention, police interrogations – to remind people that God is there, too.  Wasn’t that God’s point in sending Jesus to live among us, to walk with us in the joys and struggles of life?  To understand and develop a relationship with us?

No one should have to face life’s challenges alone, and it makes a difference when we take the time to be present rather than just provide services.

Statistically speaking, these are 8 client families representing 33 individuals receiving services in 3 program areas. That’s the “what” of our ministry.  The “how” is the relationships and trust we build, the value we place on each person as a child of God, and the mutual respect we share.  It’s relating to our clients in ways that demonstrate God’s love and care for each one of them.

Immigrant Fears Information is Key in Addressing Immigrant Fears

Recalibrating, thinking about shutting down refugee offices.

Consoling children and comforting parents fearful to leave home.

Reminding DREAMers of the risk of applying for DACA.

Grieving for people of color.

Struggling to address questions and fears among immigrant friends.

And Praying Together.

Immigration advocates and agencies – including LUCHA Ministries in Fredericksburg, Virginia – found themselves reacting in just these ways following the US presidential election of November 8.  As a part of World Relief’s Immigrant Legal Services Network, LUCHA Ministries has a goal to provide the most accurate information possible while reminding our immigrant friends of God’s constant love and presence.

Beyond expressing shock and dismay, advocates and organizers renewed their commitment to inform and educate the immigrant community on how best to respond to the election and its aftermath.

Some of the best advice advocacy groups can offer immigrants is the following:

  • Remind immigrants that, for now, nothing has changed.  All existing immigration benefits remain in place.
  • Immigration law is defined by Congress, and the majority of current US laws can only be changed by Congress.
  • Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, is still in effect.  DACA provides eligible, undocumented young people who arrived before age 16 an opportunity to remain in the US and apply for work authorization.  Those with DACA renewal should renew it within the timeframe required, before January 2017’s inauguration if possible.  Those who have never requested DACA should consult a reputable legal provider for advice before filing a DACA application.
  • Consult a reputable legal provider to be screened for other benefits besides DACA. This can be done at the same time as the DACA consultation.
  • Refugees should apply for a green card at one year of being admitted to the United States. Seek a reputable legal provider for advice and guidance.
  • The government’s priorities regarding who is to be removed from the US have not changed.  Those who do not fall in one of these priorities are less likely (but not impossible) to be deported (current removal priorities)
  • Beware of notarios and other unscrupulous people.  Only seek legal help from reputable legal providers.

It is also important that immigrants are prepared in the unfortunate event they or a family member are detained or face deportation.  You can encourage immigrants to do the following:

Make a plan now, before such an event occurs.  Educate all family members, and especially children, on where important papers are kept; important phone numbers to be memorized; which adult is in charge of children in case one or both parents are detained; and the name of an immigration lawyer to call.

Review the “Know your Rights” factsheet, and know how to respond.  According to the National Immigration Law Center, everyone has certain basic rights under the Constitution.  Here are some recommendations:

  • Exercise your right to remain silent.  You have the right to refuse to speak to immigration officers.
  • Carry a “Know-Your-Rights” card and any valid immigration documents you have.  Show them if an immigration officer stops you (click here to link to resources in English and Spanish from the National Immigration Project of the National Lawyers Guild)
  • Do not open your door unless an ICE agent shows you a warrant signed by a judge.
  • You have the right to speak to a lawyer.
  • Before you sign anything, talk to a lawyer.

Within immigrant communities, much of the news and information that they receive is in their native language.  This includes both formal sources, such as news through television, radio, or online websites, as well as informal community networks, such as people sharing information with friends and neighbors.  We can do much to calm fears and dispel rumors by remaining educated and informed, and pointing our immigrant friends to credible, trustworthy information.  And by praying.

Immigration Legal Services Program A Leap of Faith -- and Now a Reality

“Taking on an initiative this size to offer [immigration] legal services to our community is really a leap of faith for us, and we’re really excited about the opportunity to serve our community this way.”

So comments Sue Smith, executive director of LUCHA Ministries in Fredericksburg, Virginia.  Since its founding 12 years ago, LUCHA Ministries has been committed to serving the first-generation Latino immigrant community through social, spiritual and community development programs.  Taking on the task of helping all legally-qualified immigrants, both Latino and non-Latino alike, to legalize their status is a new yet daunting task.

“It is a complex process,” remarks Dr. Mukesh Srivastava, associate professor in the College of Business at the University of Mary Washington, and a native of India.  “Many times immigrants are afraid that they will take wrong steps.  And hopefully,” he continues, “there will be groups such as LUCHA who will provide you assistance in best positioning your [immigration] case.”

The U.S. Department of Justice, through the Board of Immigration Appeals, allows faith-based and other non-profit agencies such as LUCHA the ability to offer low-cost immigration legal services, explains Greg Smith, director of LUCHA Ministries’ Immigration Legal Services program.  And though the training Smith received to become the program’s accredited representative is not equivalent to that of an attorney, the agency’s desire is to help legally-qualified immigrants seeking an immigration legal benefit move through the process as smoothly and as stress-free as possible.

Offering immigration legal services to the area’s low-income immigrant community presents numerous challenges, not the least of which is supporting the program’s high financial costs.  But we believe this is an essential step in our calling as Christians to welcome the stranger among us (Matthew 25:35-36).  It is important for LUCHA Ministries’ many friends and supporters to take on this challenge with us and give generously so that legally-qualified immigrants in the greater Fredericksburg area may receive the assistance they need.

“When we help immigrants with their legal status,” she explains, “we help not only the individual but also the family.  We make an impact on the children, an impact that will last for generations to come.”

Smith goes on to add, “Because you have a heart for immigrants too, we invite you to partner with us.  We invite you to give generously to help make this program a reality in our community.”

“We need your prayers, we need your resources, we need your donations to be able to do this ministry, to take this leap of faith.  We thank you in advance for your prayers and for your support.  May God bless.”

Being Brown in the USA Race, Ethnicity, and the Struggle for Identity

“When I looked in the mirror, I hated what I saw there, I hated who I was.  I saw brown, and I hated being brown.”

While “brown” isn’t a race, people are often stereotyped based on their appearance and skin color, including the spectrum of “brownness.”  And for many Latino youth, this can lead to serious issues with identity, particularly when they don’t fit the stereotype.

For Alan*, the journey to self-acceptance has been hard, lonely, and hurtful.  Many look at him and see another young Spanish-speaking Mexican immigrant, struggling to make ends meet through jobs that require hard physical labor and little education.  But this perception is far from reality.

Alan was born in the US to middle-class Hispanic parents; his family’s immigrant story includes Mexican-born migrant workers in California, European Jews fleeing persecution, and ancestors from Spain.  Alan didn’t grow up speaking Spanish.  “I’m learning,” he jokes.  “Even though I look Latino, I’m different, I don’t feel like one of them, because of my language and culture.”

I often encounter youth like Alan who get lost in their search for identity and belonging.  They resent being labeled “Mexican” when they are, in fact, Salvadoran, Nicaraguan, or Colombian.  An immigrant family of four from Nicaragua moved from a small apartment in a school district with a relatively large Latino population to a more rural school district, where they purchased a house in a better, safer neighborhood.

Their son, Andres*, was one of the only Latinos in his new middle school.  He was called “the Mexican kid” by his peers, and no amount of explaining about his heritage made any difference.  He soon came to hate school.  He was ashamed of his family’s language, culture, and ways of doing things, and he soon began hanging out with the “wrong kind of kids.”  His parents no longer knew his friends, he was experimenting with drugs and alcohol, and obsessed with gang culture.  The family finally made the difficult decision to move back to a neighborhood with more Latino immigrants and racial diversity, a school where their son felt less isolated as a Latino immigrant.

Like Andres, many immigrant youth experiment with alcohol or drugs or negative behavior simply to fit in with a particular group, usually “American” peers.  Marisol*, a 9th grader, was finishing her first year at a new, predominantly white school, and two girls asked her to watch the bathroom door while they were in a stall using drugs.  Her reason?  “I wanted them to like me, I wanted to have friends.  No one had asked me to do anything all year, and I thought they would be my friends.”  When the girls were caught by a teacher, the girls insisted it was the “Mexican” girl who had put them up to the incident.  It was Marisol who ended up suspended and who spent a year in Alternative School, primarily because she was ashamed to tell her parents what had happened.

Some youth “choose” not to be smart at school, because they only see “white” kids in advanced classes.  When asked about their grades in 8th grade, Javier and José stated that they would “be smart next year, when it counts.  It’s not cool to be smart.”  Javier, a US citizen whose parents are Guatemalan, is now a Marine.  “I was pretty stupid back then,” he says.  “Thank goodness I had adult mentors and people who cared about me who helped me get over that!”  And José is a college student, holding down two part-time jobs to pay his way through school.

Others deal with the pain of social isolation and identity by self-mutilation or attempts at suicide.  A recently-arrived teen from Guatemala, Daniel,* was identified as being at a high risk for suicide and was hospitalized.  He had just begun experimenting with self-mutilation, and his mom was terrified.  “I just don’t understand,” she said.  “We give him everything he needs.”  His parents couldn’t identify with Daniel’s feelings of being “stupid” in school as he struggled with English, with his sense of loss at no longer living in a rural village with grandparents who had been like parents the past 8 years, or with his struggle to accept his place as the oldest sibling in his US family.  “My mom left me,” says Daniel in Spanish.  “And now she brings me here, to be with my ‘family,’ and everything is supposed to be OK.  It doesn’t work like that.  I need some time.”

These types of situations baffle immigrant parents, who wonder why their children can’t embrace the opportunities they’ve worked so hard to provide.  While the stories of Andres, Marisol, Javier and José, and Daniel are all different, they have all struggled with issues of race, ethnicity, and culture.  They’re all second generation immigrants, caught between two worlds.  Through counseling and pastoral care, I help families understand this struggle for identity, the competing cultural values in their children’s lives, and the challenges of raising children in another culture.  And I help the teens know that it’s OK to be

Today, Alan no longer hates his brownness.  He’s a college student with plans for seminary and eventually earning a Ph.D., with a focus on Latino/Hispanic theology.  Thanks to caring individuals who recognized his struggle for cultural identity, he has moved beyond perception and embraced his Latino heritage as a positive force in his life.

“I’m still defined by being brown, but that’s OK.  Jesus is brown, too.”

By Sue Smith, D.Min., MSW, LSW

*Names have been changed

Nourishment for the Fredericksburg Community LUCHA's Hunger Relief Ministry

By Caitlyn Furr

I have the privilege of interning with LUCHA ministries this summer through the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship’s (CBF) Student.Go program. After completing CBF’s orientation, I began interning with LUCHA at the beginning of June. I am a graduate student at Emory, seeking a Master’s of Divinity and a Master’s of Public Health. This internship at LUCHA provides me the opportunity to learn about ministry, community development and holistic health all at once. I can’t believe how much I have learned and experienced already!

On Mondays, I participate in LUCHA’s food ministry, which is operated by dedicated volunteers in the community. They arrive at the food bank in Fredericksburg on Monday mornings and spend at least an hour carefully selecting food items to purchase. Once they have selected and paid for the food by pound, they load about 5 shopping carts full of food into their own cars. They drive to Sylvania Heights Baptist Church, which has graciously allowed LUCHA to use its facilities, to sort the food. The volunteers create boxes of food, which include fresh produce, meat, packaged foods, hygiene products, and much more, for families in the community. The volunteers are well-acquainted with the families who will receive the food, so they personalize the boxes to ensure needs are met. For example, if a family has an infant, the volunteers will ensure that family’s box contains diapers. Finally, the volunteers hand deliver boxes to the families in the community. The entire process takes about 4 hours, but many of the same volunteers help every week. I am incredibly impressed with the compassion displayed by LUCHA’s volunteers, and the thoughtfulness they put in to each box they deliver. The program is effective in providing for needs in the community while also encouraging relationship building.

I’ve had the opportunity over the past few weeks to meet various members of the Fredericksburg community who are served by LUCHA. It is clear that they trust and respect LUCHA and its programming. The needs within the community are many, but the community members feel connected to LUCHA and it gives them hope. LUCHA is a place where Latinos in Fredericksburg can turn when they need help, and it works to provide for their needs without judgment. LUCHA is a wonderful example of the love of Christ within the Fredericksburg community. I am grateful to be a part of it this summer, and continue to learn from this ministry.

Each year, the Cinco Panes (Five Loaves) food pantry serves approximately 1,200 persons in need.  Through the years, the ministry has evolved from a more traditional style pantry that provides boxes of groceries  to needy families to a more participatory model where the clients themselves have become the volunteers.  This new model has created a sense of community among many Latino immigrants who otherwise wouldn’t know each other.  The volunteers are Roman Catholic, Pentecostal, and Baptist; Puerto Rican, Mexican, Salvadoran, and Guatemalan; young and not-so-young.  The ministry helps non/limited-English-speaking immigrants gain a greater sense of self worth as they work together for the greater good of the Latino community.  And it gives parents and youth the opportunity to work together.  During the past year, over 70 persons have served as volunteer.

Beyond the Band-Aid Legal Aid Ministry that Makes a Difference

Band-Aid:

ˈbandād/ noun  NORTH AMERICAN trademark

  1. an adhesive bandage with a gauze pad in the center, used to cover minor wounds.
  2. a makeshift or temporary solution: “A band-aid solution to a much deeper problem”

 

We all know what a Band-Aid is, and we all know what a Band-Aid does.  A Band-Aid covers a wound…and really not much else.  It may make the scratch feel better, but the soft, thin gauze won’t protect it from a bump, bruise, or bully; nor would it protect the wound from a bacterial infection from within.  Without the help of Neosporin, a Band-Aid would only absorb the bleeding; it would not treat, cure, or prevent the wound from bleeding—nor was it meant to.

This very same principle applies to Band-Aid solutions.  Aptly-named, these solutions are just that:  insufficient covers to the real wounds that lie beneath.  Problems covered up by Band-Aid solutions aren’t protected from bruises (obstacles) or bullies (opposition) or even “bacterial infections from within” (inefficiencies).  Without using other resources to help treat or cure the problem, temporary solutions remain just that.  Band-Aid solutions only cover up the real issue; although they may make the problem appear fixed by absorbing its initial symptoms, they do not protect or prevent the wound in the first place—nor were they meant to.

Immigration Clinic

So where does that leave us when the wounds we deal with impact people’s daily lives?  What do we do when Band-Aid solutions just aren’t working anymore?

We go beyond the Band-Aid.

LUCHA wants to offer more than Band-Aid solutions to the variety of issues surrounding immigration, not least legal affairs.  That’s why LUCHA is in the process of becoming recognized by the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA).  [For more information on that, read our previous blog post.]  At a recent weekend conference hosted by the Baptist General Association of Virginia, LUCHA founders Greg and Sue Smith explained why providing legal aid is more than a Band-Aid approach to ministry.  “We were really moved by this [concept]” stated Sue Smith, “Legal aid is a practical, tangible, immediate way to show the love of Jesus Christ to our immigrant neighbors.”

20160430_135432
Greg Smith representing LUCHA Ministries at the BGAV Mission Matters Conference on April 30, 2016

To the 12 attendees at LUCHA’s breakout session at the BGAV’s Mission Matters Conference, it was evident that the Smiths are really passionate about getting this information out to as many people as possible.  If you are interested in legal aid ministry, or just basic immigration law and practice, LUCHA will be hosting a 40-hour Basic Immigration Law and Procedure Training seminar in partnership with World Relief Immigration Legal Services on October 10-14th this year at Manassas Baptist Church in Manassas, VA.  For more information, feel free to contact us or follow this link to register.

Immigration Legal Services Taking "Welcoming the Stranger" a Step Farther

On April 15th, LUCHA submitted the paperwork to the U.S. Department of Justice’s Board of Immigration Appeals requesting recognition that will allow us to open an Immigration Legal Services office.  As a BIA-recognized agency, LUCHA Ministries will have the capacity to offer low-cost immigration legal services by assisting qualifying immigrants applying for an immigration legal benefit, by providing counsel on
immigration legal matters, and by representing immigrants before the Department of Homeland Security.

LUCHA Ministries Immigration Legal Services will serve immigrants applying for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA); Temporary Protective Status (TPS); Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS); and Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA)[1].  Additional services may include assistance with family-based petitions and other means for seeking legal status in the U.S.

The services LUCHA Ministries has provided to immigrants through the years are based on Matthew 25:35-36. We’ve welcomed immigrants in our community by providing food and clothing, facilitating opportunities for fellowship and personal growth, helping people obtain medical and dental care, and visiting them in ICE detention and jail.  And now, we’re taking our commitment to serve the immigrant community one step farther by beginning an Immigration Legal Services Program. “I assure you that when you have welcomed the stranger, one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you have done it for me,” says Jesus in this passage.  And when Jesus talks about welcoming the stranger, it’s based on personal experience. Jesus was once a refugee, taken as a child to another country to escape persecution and certain death. His family was seeking asylum..

Immigration Clinic

The lack of legal status keeps people living in fear.  Maria* frantically called an American friend on her cell phone on the way to church one evening.  “There’s a police car that’s been following me, and it into the church parking lot when I did!”, she said.  Maria’s friend went outside to meet her at the car and walk inside the church with Maria and her two sons.  Maria, who is undocumented and does not have a drivers’ license, was trembling with fear and began sobbing by the time she entered the church.  While she has lived in the U.S. for over 14 years and never committed any crimes or had traffic violations, she lives in fear of being stopped and deported.

The lack of legal status prevents people from obtaining better, more stable jobs to provide for their families.   Ana,* a single mom with three children, had worked at the same fast-food restaurant for 5 years and made $9.50 per hour.  When she became pregnant, she worked as long as possible, but had to quit her job right before the baby was born.  When she returned to work two months later, she was re-hired at minimum wage, $7.25.  She was told that there was “significant turn-over” of the staff and that all personnel were new — and employed at the $7.25 “entry level” rate.  Ana didn’t have a valid work permit, and she felt lucky to have a job.

The lack of legal status promotes distrust of authority and discourages integration into community life.  Jose’s* neighbor was pounding on his door late one night.  “There’s an intruder in my apartment with a knife, threatening to kill us all!” the neighbor said.  “Please call 911!”  But when the police arrived, they went to Jose’s apartment and asked to see his ID.  They began questioning Jose about his legal status rather than searching for the intruder, who had fled the area and was loose in the neighborhood.

With over 11 million undocumented persons living in the U.S., not all qualify for an immigration benefit, or in other words, have the ability to “become legal.”  But many are like Maria, Ana, and Jose, trying to carve out a better life in the United States for themselves and for their families.  They want to participate in community activities, to earn a living and provide for their children, and to help their neighbors.  And with sound, affordable legal assistance, many can obtain legal status. While many immigrants would agree that they’re living a “better life” simply by being in the United States, legal status is the missing piece that will help them regain a sense of dignity and self-respect, and to fully engage in the life of our communities.

[1] Only if the US Supreme Court issues a favorable ruling for DAPA in June 2016.

“Compared to the situation at hand…there is a big need.” Reflections on Immigration Law: Quotes from BGAV's Basic Immigration Law and Procedure Training

*All quotes are direct from anonymous participants at the BGAV Law Training

Representative from Poarch Law Firm led the training seminars
Representative from Poarch Law Firm led the training seminars

In the middle of last month, LUCHA’s administrator and co-founder Greg Smith facilitated a Basic Immigration Law and Procedure Training event at the Baptist General Association of Virginia (BGAV). Co-sponsored by the BGAV and Poarch Law Firm, this 40-hour training seminar was designed for staff and volunteers serving through non-profit religious, social service, and charitable organizations who wish to provide legal services to qualified immigrants.  This training fulfilled one of many requirements to receive Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) recognition and accreditation—without which a person, representative, or organization cannot officially provide legal services or counsel to immigrants.  Considering that Virginia “has the ninth-largest immigrant population in the U.S., with 11 percent of the state’s population being foreign-born[1],” and only 16 BIA-recognized organizations[2], there is indeed a big need.

“These people [immigrants] have been stigmatized by the media and politicians…”

The participants of this training spanned numerous states and careers, some motivated to learn more about immigration law by their church’s Latino immigrant ministries, others by the dismaying stories of undocumented children, and others still by the work of LUCHA and their hope of becoming BIA accredited.  Regardless of the various reasons why they were there, the participants were collectively motivated by the human faces behind the media coverage of immigration stories.  Undocumented immigrants in particular have receiving the brunt of adverse and untrue media, and the extremely polarizing election season this year has only exacerbated antagonistic media coverage of immigration issues.  Consequently, the rhetoric of this hot-button issue has overshadowed its humanity and our responsibility, as Christ-followers, to love and serve our neighbors.  As one seminar participant noted, irrespective of political affiliation, that: “There are a lot of good people—a lot of good Christians—who have been spun into the narrative of the media.”  This training brought back into focus the rights of immigrants and the opportunities we all have to protect and uphold those rights.

“I don’t want to know this stuff and not be able to use it.”

Law training 3
Nearly 20 people from various career backgrounds attended the Basic Immigration Law Training in Richmond, VA

Participants left the Immigration Law Training at the end of the week with heads and hands full of information on how to (and how not to) help immigrants regarding legal issues.  If you are interested in immigration law or issues, here are some great resources to check out suggested by this training’s participants:

Enrique’s Journey, by Sonia Nazario found here

The Stranger, a short film by the Evangelical Immigration Table

Immigrant Legal Resource Center website

Recognized Organizations and Accredited Representative Roster by State and City

 

[1] http://www.thecommonwealthinstitute.org/2013/04/25/the-facts-on-virginias-immigrant-communities/

[2] https://www.justice.gov/file/439431/download

#11for11million 11 Days for the 11 Million: Recapping LUCHA's first Instagrampaign

On April 2nd, we finished our first-ever social media awareness campaign, #11for11million!  What does that hashtag mean, you wonder?  With the introduction of our Instagram account, we took 11 days to highlight immigration issues in the U.S. and to give you an inside look into who we are and why we do what we do.  …And where did we get 11 million from?  ~11 million is the Center for Migration Studies’ estimated number of undocumented immigrants in the U.S. today, the vast majority being from our Spanish-speaking neighbors, Mexico and Central America’s Northern Triangle (Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala.)
So, if you joined along during our Instagrampaign, THANK YOU!  And if this is your first time hearing about it, THANK YOU, TOO!  We are so excited you’ve come this far to learn more about us.  In case you missed our first Instagrampaign, have no fear!  Here is a quick recap of #11for11million:
(Of course, you can always go follow us on Instagram @luchaministries and go check it out for yourself!  And while you’re at it, check out our Facebook and Twitter accounts, too.) 

Day 1:  We initiated our Instagram account with a dedication to the near 11 million undocumented immigrants in the U.S. today, as well as introduced our campaign, #11for11million.

Day 2:  For our first post on #MakingAMinistry, we highlighted our commitment to human rights through our daily services and advocacy efforts.

Day 3:  Go local!  We shared our desire for increased community awareness and engagement with the Latino immigrant population who are our neighbors in the greater Fredericksburg area.

Day 4:  This #MakingAMinistry post focused on our training & education services for both our clients and the greater community in which we serve.

Day 5:  Our final post on #MakingAMinistry recognized our identity as a faith-based nonprofit motivated by the life and love of Jesus Christ.

Day 6:  We met Greg & Sue Smith on Day 6 of #11for11million!  This husband and wife team founded LUCHA Ministries in 2004 after returning from a 12-year stint in Costa Rica.

Day 7:  We continuegreg and sued to #MeetTheMakers of LUCHA by highlighting our incredible support from individual donors, churches, and faith-based organizations (like the BGAV and CBF), whose support makes LUCHA’s ministries possible!

Day 8:  In a switch from Who We Are (our motivations) to What We Do (our ministries), we called attention to the various services we provide to our clients, including immediate relief as well as long-term support to holistically address the needs of the Latino immigrant community.

Day 9:  Project ¡Adelante!, our women’s empowerment group, was our first #MinistryMoment, and you can read more about them in the “A Beloved Community” below!

Day 10:  The highlighted #MinistryMoment of the day was our after-school study buddies program, Bridges of Hope.  Bridgestudy buddies 3s of Hope is our educational service “umbrella” that also provides other educational trainings, like ESL and computer literacy seminars.

Day 11:  Our last day emphasized how grateful we are that you joined us for #11for11million!  So, a huge shout-out goes to YOU for being a part of that!

Thank you, again, for joining us in our #11for11million campaign and for your interest in immigration issues in your community and country.  Be on the lookout for more news and updates from LUCHA!

As a special thank-you for getting this far, here’s a heads up for you full-length readers:  #11for11thousand is coming soon!  Keep up with us for more details!

 

A Dangerous Journey They know the dangers and they come anyway. What does that say about the situations they left?

Decision to immigrate to the US aren't made lightly
The decision to immigrate to the US isn’t made lightly, no matter what the circumstances are in one’s home country

 Since 2014, Central Americans have been fleeing their homes en masse in hopes of making it to the United States. Officially recognized by President Obama as a humanitarian crisis , the Northern Triangle region (including El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras) is plagued by dangerously high rates of gang-related violence, political insecurity, and organized crime groups; in fact, this region hosts some of the most violent countries in the world, with El Salvador noted as “the world’s most violent country not at war” (http://on.cfr.org/1PTk574).

Contrary to Popular Belief

This violence is one of the most critical factors for the rise in Central American immigration to the U.S. in recent years. A Pew Research Center poll found that in 2014 undocumented immigrants comprised 3.5% of the total U.S. population, of which Mexican immigrants make up 49% . Contrary to popular belief, there has actually been a decrease in Mexican nationals immigrating to the U.S.; but, the rise in Central American immigration has kept the percentage of undocumented immigrants around a steady 3.5% of the total U.S. population.

Once these asylum-seekers finally reach the United States (if they even do), their dangerous journey does not get any easier. The proliferation of anti-immigrant rhetoric and action within the public and political realms has given undocumented immigrants little chance of hope for reprieve.

So, why don’t they immigrate legally?

Greg Smith, co-founder and coordinator of LUCHA Ministries, explained the four pathways for legal immigration to the U.S. at the Cooperative Baptist Foundation’s annual Advocacy in Action event in Washington, D.C. last week. Legal immigration can occur through family ties, employment opportunities, a diversity lottery, or as asylum; however, each of these methods has a very long process with limited chance of success.

Family ties: This option has many stipulations that the immigrants must go through to take place successfully, most importantly having a petitioning US citizen or legal permanent resident relative, and even then there is very limited availability for legal immigrants this way.

Employment opportunities: Probably one of the better-known pathways to immigration, this option provides only 10,000 visas for unskilled workers annually through the Third Preference EB-3 category, with the backlog for filling these visas sometimes a decade or more.

Diversity lottery: This lottery provides the chance for people from underrepresented nationalities to immigrate to the United States with the possibility of citizenship. As you can guess, this is not a likely option for Central American immigrants.

Asylum: The U.S. provides asylum to refugees fleeing humanitarian crises in their home countries. Although President Obama has recognized the violence and organized crime of the Northern Triangle to be a humanitarian crisis, Central American immigrants fleeing violence at home are often not recognized as refugees and are therefore not automatically granted humanitarian asylum in the United States.

Take Action. Advocate.

Greg Smith and his wife Sue, executive director of LUCHA Ministries, asked the 30 people in attendance at their Advocacy in Action seminar to visit or write to their state representatives about immigration reform, particularly in the case of Central Americans. Among many issues facing Central American immigrants (not limited to ICE raids, deferred action status, and detention center treatment) is legal representation. Because US immigration law does not grant an attorney to immigrants at government cost, Miranda Rights are not afforded to them; therefore, children who appear in immigration court who cannot afford proper legal representation (i.e. the vast majority) must defend themselves.

Greg Smith and others talk with an aide to Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA) about current legislation that affects immigrants
Greg Smith and others talk with an aide to Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA) about proposed legislation that affects immigrants

With little to no knowledge or resources to guide them in immigration law, children must try to navigate their court proceedings for one of the most unmistakably confounding areas of U.S. law.

The Fair Day in Court for Kids Act of 2016 proposal by Senator Harry Reid (D-NV) and others calls for the provision of legal counsel to unaccompanied children as well as a general review of immigration court efficiency, including reducing costs and increasing access to legal information. (Read the full draft here: http://1.usa.gov/1QY59mc)

Take action with us and ask your representatives to support the Fair Day in Court for Kids Act. Advocate alongside the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, LUCHA Ministries, and the many others who believe that Central Americans deserve the chance to have a happy ending to their dangerous journey.

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